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Race Discrimination

Justice starts today with a confidential attorney consultation.

Workplace race discrimination involves treating a Maryland employee or job applicant unfavorably because they are of a certain race or because of personal characteristics associated with race (such as their hair texture, skin color, or certain facial features).

 

A related concept, workplace color discrimination, involves treating a Maryland employee or job applicant unfavorably because of their skin color or complexion.

 

Workplace race discrimination also can involve treating someone unfavorably because the person is married to (or associated with) a person of a certain race or color. Contrary to popular knowledge, workplace race discrimination can occur when the victim and the person who inflicted the discrimination are the same race or color.

At the Employment Law Center of Maryland, we are proud to represent victims of workplace race discrimination in every Maryland federal, state, and administrative court—combatting racism in the workplace and advancing the cause of racial equality for our clients, but also future generations to come. 

If you are facing workplace race discrimination, contact us today for a confidential consultation with a Maryland race discrimination lawyer.

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Justice for workplace race discrimination starts today with a confidential lawyer consultation.

Federal Race DISCRIMINATION laws

 

There are two important federal laws prohibiting workplace race discrimination. The first is Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). The second is the Civil Rights Act of 1866 (known as Section 1981). Let's talk about each in turn.

Title VII applies to Maryland employers who have at least 15 employees (this does not include independent contractors).

note on Title VII's workplace race discrimination employer size requirement

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) only applies to Maryland employers with at least 15 employees.

Title VII prohibits a variety of discriminatory employment actions—if they are based in part on race or color. These include racially discriminatory actions in:

  • hiring;

  • terminations (i.e., firings or layoffs);

  • transfers;

  • demotions;

  • negative referrals to a prospective employer; and,

  • harassment.

While many individuals and employers are familiar with Title VII, they may be less familiar with the Civil Rights Act of 1866 (Section 1981). Like Title VII, Section 1981 protects Maryland employees from discriminatory employment decisions based on race. However, there are some important differences between the two federal laws, including:

  • Section 1981 only protects against race discrimination (whereas Title VII protects against other types of discrimination, like sex discrimination);

  • Section 1981 covers all private employers, regardless of the number of employees;

  • Section 1981 contains no statute of limitations (however, Maryland's two-year statute of limitations applies)

  • Section 1981 only applies in cases where the employer is charged with intentional discrimination; and,

  • Section 1981 does not provide a statutory cap to its punitive damage awards.

note that Section 1981 covers workplace race discrimination at all employers, regardless of size

The Civil Rights Act of 1866 (Section 1981) applies to Maryland employers of any size.

graphic that Section 1981 has no time limit on workplace race discrimination claims

The Civil Rights Act of 1866 (Section 1981) itself has no statute of limitations (but Maryland's two-year statute of limitations does apply).

At the Employment Law Center of Maryland, we file workplace race discrimination cases in the U.S. Federal District Court for the District of Maryland. If you need to speak with a Maryland race discrimination lawyer, contact us today for a confidential lawyer consultation.

Paper Abstract

Justice for workplace race discrimination starts today with a confidential lawyer consultation.

Maryland Race DISCRIMINATION laws

 

Workplace race and color discrimination is illegal in Maryland under Md. Code, State Gov't § 20-606 (Title 20).

Similarly to Title VII, Maryland's Title 20 states that a Maryland employer may not "fail or refuse to hire, discharge, or otherwise discriminate against any individual with respect to the individual's compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment because of [race] [or] [color]," and further states than a Maryland employer may not "discriminate or retaliate against any of its employees or applicants for employment" because they oppose (i.e., complain of) race discrimination at work.

graphic noting that Maryland's workplace race discrimination law make it illegal for a Maryland employer to discriminate based on an employee's race or color

Maryland's Title 20 makes it illegal for an employer to discriminate against an individual because of their race or color.

note that race discrimination in Maryland includes retaliation for complaints of race discrimination in the workplace

Maryland's Title 20 also makes it illegal for an employer to retaliate against any employee for opposing (i.e., complaining of) race discrimination at work.

Like Title VII, Title 20 only applies to employers "engaged in business or industry that employs at least 15 employees."

graphic showing that Maryland's workplace race discrimination law only applies to employers with at least 15 employees

Maryland's Title 20's prohibitions on workplace race discrimination only applies to employers with at least 15 employees.

At the Employment Law Center of Maryland, we pursue workplace race discrimination cases under Title 20 in Maryland's circuit courts. If you need a Maryland race discrimination lawyer, contact us for a confidential lawyer consultation.

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When you're ready to start fighting back against race discrimination in the workplaceyou won't be fighting alone.

LOCAL Race DISCRIMINATION Laws

 

At least five Maryland counties have their own laws prohibiting race discrimination in the workplace.

map showing Maryland counties with laws that prohibit race discrimination in the workplace

The following Maryland county codes prohibit race-based discrimination in the workplace, and allow for discrimination lawsuits to be filed charging violations of county fair-employment statutes or codes:

  • Baltimore County. The Baltimore County Code prohibits race discrimination in the workplace by employers of any size.

  • Frederick County. The Frederick County Code prohibits race discrimination in the workplace by employers with at least 15 employees.

  • Howard County. The Howard County Code prohibits race discrimination in the workplace by employers with at least 5 employees.

note that several Maryland counties have laws prohibiting race discrimination in the workplace

Some Maryland counties (e.g., Montgomery County) prohibit race discrimination in the workplace by employers of any size—unlike federal or state law.

At the Employment Law Center of Maryland, we consider federal, state, and county laws in assessing every workplace race discrimination case. If you need a Maryland race discrimination lawyer, contact us for a confidential lawyer consultation.

Paper Abstract

Justice for workplace race discrimination starts today with a confidential lawyer consultation.

graphic for workplace race discrimination in Maryland FAQ
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When you're ready to start fighting back against workplace race discriminationyou won't be fighting alone.

Blog Posts

For more on workplace race discrimination in Maryland, check out our team's most recent blog post on this topic:

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Helpful Links

For additional resources on race discrimination in the workplace in Maryland, check out the following helpful links:

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Justice for workplace race discrimination starts today with a confidential lawyer consultation.